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Wednesday, July 15, 2020 | History

2 edition of Cell wall autolysis and turnover in bacillus subtilis found in the catalog.

Cell wall autolysis and turnover in bacillus subtilis

Pieter Diederick Meyer

Cell wall autolysis and turnover in bacillus subtilis

by Pieter Diederick Meyer

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  • 26 Currently reading

Published by Elinkwijk in Utrecht .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Bacterial cell walls.,
  • Autolysis.,
  • Bacillus subtilis.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementPieter Diederick Meyer.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination139 p. :
    Number of Pages139
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15523406M

    Bacillus subtilis mutants with reduced rates of cell wall autolysis reached a constant rate of wall turnover after a longer lag than the standard strain but eventually showed the same turnover rate.   JOURNAL OF FERMENTATION AND BIOENGINEERING Vol. 70, No. 1, Cell Death of Bacillus subtilis Caused by Surfactants at Low Concentrations Results from Induced Cell Autolysis HEON-YOUNG CHO, TETSUAKI TSUCHIDO,* HISAYO ONO, AND MITSUO TAKANO Department of Fermentation Technology, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka , Japan Received 24 .

    The biggest driver for study of B. subtilis, at least in the s to s, was probably interest in endospore (spore) formation (Fig. ).Sporulation of B. subtilis is triggered essentially by nutrient stress. The process begins with a modified, highly asymmetric cell division. This generates a small prespore (sometimes called forespore) cell, destined to become the mature endospore, and a. The composition and fine structure of the vegetative cell wall peptidoglycan from Bacillus subtilis were determined by analysis of its constituent muropeptides. The structures of 39 muropeptides, representing 97% of the total peptidoglycan, were elucidated. About 99% analyzed muropeptides in B. subtilis vegetative cell peptidoglycan have the free carboxylic group of diaminopimelic acid amidated.

    Cell wall structure approximately 10 times thicker than in the E. coli cell wall, and therefore the B. subtilis cell wall can withstand a turgor pressure of approximately 24 atm (ca. 2,) [4, 7]. The cross-linkage index of the E. coli peptidoglycan is approximately 50% of . The ability to recover components of their own cell wall is a common feature of bacteria. This was initially recognized in the Gram-negative bacterium Escherichia coli, which recycles about half of the peptidoglycan of its cell wall during one cell doubling. Moreover, E. coli was shown to grow on pe .


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Cell wall autolysis and turnover in bacillus subtilis by Pieter Diederick Meyer Download PDF EPUB FB2

Bacillus subtilis mutants with reduced rates of cell wall autolysis reached a constant rate of wall turnover after a longer lag than the standard strain but eventually showed the same turnover rate. In reverse, a turnover-deficient mutant autolysed at a slightly higher rate than the standard by: 7.

Bacillus subtilis mutants with reduced rates of cell wall autolysis reached a constant rate of wall turnover after a longer lag than the standard strain but eventually showed the same turnover. Abstract. The kinetics of cell wall turnover in Bacillus subtilis have been examined in detail.

After pulse labeling of the peptidoglycan with N-acetylglucosamine, the newly formed peptidoglycan is stable for approximately three-quarters of a generation and is Cited by: Lysis of exponential cultures of B. subtilis follows the addition of reagents that dissipate either the electrical or pH gradients of cellular membranes.

Stationary-phase cells or cultures that have been inhibited in division by macromolecular-synthesis inhibitors also lyse when uncoupling agents or ionophores are added to the growth medium. Autolysis occurs after brief starvation for a carbon Cited by: Cell wall autolysis was also optimal at M NaCl.

Bacillus subtilis Ni15 is deficient in cell wall turnover. This deficiency is removed if the medium contains M NaCl, which does not. Vitković L, Cheung HY, Freese E.

Absence of correlation between rates of cell wall turnover and autolysis shown by Bacillus subtilis mutants. J Bacteriol. Jan; (1)– [PMC free article] Ward JB. The chain length of the glycans in bacterial cell walls. Biochem J. Jun; (2)– [PMC free article]. CwlC is found in the mother cell wall and functions for the lysis of the mother cell wall.

CwlC does not have a signal sequence but participates in late sporulation and is present in the cell wall. [14] [15] It was found in B. subtilis that CwlC is able to hydrolyze both vegetative cell walls and spore peptidoglycan. One of the reported phenotypes of Bacillus subtilis strains containing the lyt mutations is a deficiency in cell wall turnover.

However, it has recently been shown in our laboratory that these mutant cells can turn over their walls under certain conditions (Vitkovic et al.

[2, 11] and Abstr.K3, Annu. Meet. Soc. Microbiol.,p. ).I show in this paper that the long lag in wall. control of autolysin activity in B. subtilis is related to the energized membrane. Introduction For several bacteria, cell division is accompanied by a loss of cell wall components into the culture medium.

For example, balanced growth in Bacillus subtilis (Pooley, a; Glaser and Lindsay, ) Staphy. In Bacillus subtilis, antibiotics that impair cell wall synthesis induce a characteristic stress response including the σW and σM regulons and the previously uncharacterized yoeB gene.

Here we demonstrate that YoeB is a cell wall-associated protein with weak sequence similarity to a noncatalytic domain of class B penicillin-binding proteins. A yoeB -null mutant exhibits an increased rate of.

Cell separation, motility, autolysis, cell wall turnover and growth were not affected in strains devoid of the N‐acetylglucosaminidase. A mutant deficient in the two most abundant autolysins, i.e. the LytC amidase and the glucosaminidase, exhibited the phenotype of the amidase‐deficient strains, revealing their non‐requirement for growth.

Mauck J, Chan L, Glaser L. Turnover of the cell wall of Gram-positive bacteria. J Biol Chem. Mar 25; (6)– Mauck J, Glaser L. Turnover of the cell wall of Bacillus subtilis W during logarithmic growth. Biochem Biophys Res Commun. Glaser L, Lindsay B. Relation between cell wall turnover and cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

J Bacteriol. May; (2)– [PMC free article] Hageman JH, Carlton BC. An enzymatic and immunological comparison of two proteases from a transformable Bacillus subtilis with the "subtilisins". Arch Biochem Biophys.

Jul; (1)–   Turnover rates were determined as described in the text. Cell wall autolysis rates at different temperatures Isolated cell walls of B.

subtilis will, as isolated by water washing of French Press-broken cells, sponta- neously undergo autolysis when suspended in various buffers [19,32,33].

Jolliffe LK, Doyle RJ, Streips UN. Extracellular proteases modify cell wall turnover in Bacillus subtilis. J Bacteriol. Mar; (3)– [PMC free article] Jolliffe LK, Doyle RJ, Streips UN. The energized membrane and cellular autolysis in Bacillus subtilis.

Cell. Sep; 25 (3)– Koch AL, Higgins ML, Doyle RJ. Glaser L, Lindsay B. Relation between cell wall turnover and cell growth in Bacillus subtilis.

J Bacteriol. May; (2)– [Europe PMC free article] [Google Scholar] Hageman JH, Carlton BC. An enzymatic and immunological comparison of two proteases from a transformable Bacillus subtilis with the "subtilisins".

Arch Biochem Biophys. Some TiO 2 NPs appeared to be closely associated with the cell wall of B. subtilis. Cell culture selection. Bacillus subtilis ATCC is a well-studied model organism for autolysis.

The most obvious effect of LTA was a lowered first-order rate of release of labeled wall material; calculations according to the model for cell wall turnover in Bacillus spp. formulated by De Boer et al.

De Boer, F. Kruyssen, and J. Wouters, J. Bacteriol.) revealed changes in wall geometry and not in turnover. Vitković L.

Wall turnover deficiency of Bacillus subtilis Ni15 is due to a decrease in teichoic acid. Can J Microbiol. Jun; 33 (6)– Vitković L, Cheung HY, Freese E. Absence of correlation between rates of cell wall turnover and autolysis shown by Bacillus subtilis.

Mechanical consequences of cell-wall turnover in the elongation of a Gram-positive bacterium. Biophys. J.:(11); [PubMed] [] (I p) Morgan Beeby, James C Gumbart, Benoît Roux, Grant J Jensen Architecture and assembly of the Gram-positive cell wall.

Mol. Microbiol.:88(4). The cell wall of Bacillus subtilis Marburg is a thick mat of peptidoglycan, teichoic acid and adventitiously bound proteins. The wall is 25–30 nm thick (Beveridge and Murray, ) and is composed of approximately equal amounts, by weight, of peptidoglycan and α-D.

Turnover of cell walls of Bacillus subtilis occurs in three distinct phases: a lag phase, a relatively rapid phase persisting for 2–3 generations and a much slower phase continuing for several additional generations. A lectin probe revealed that cell pole material was lost during the slow phase of turnover and that the loss of wall occurred in zones, beginning at the cylinder-pole junction.

The Bacillus subtilis spo0A mutant is an adequate host for extracellular protein production (e.g., α-amylase).However the mutant was prone to cell lysis. SDS–PAGE and zymography of cell wall lytic proteins indicated that the spo0A mutant contained high amounts of two major autolysins (LytC [CwlB] and LytD [CwlG]) and two minor cell wall lytic enzymes (LytE [CwlF] and LytF [CwlE]).